How full-time working Millenials triumphed IronMan Davao 2018

 
 

Community Contribution by Christine De Siree F. Jodloman, June 2018

We are often caught up between having a healthy lifestyle, and meeting the demands of our work. However, these full-time working millennials will prove otherwise. They have triumphed in IronMan Davao 2018 without any experience in triathlon. They will surely be your next fitspiration.

  Dianne Morales

Dianne Morales

Dianne Morales was living life like a typical millennial: poor diet, zero exercise, and sleeping late. She never did any sports and hated physical activity. “Grabbing the opportunity opened to us by the company brought good things to my health. Training was not easy; especially waking up early, having constant battle in the mind, fighting laziness, people from all around doubting your capabilities, and balancing work demands. I had zero experience, but I was able to finish the run leg of the IronMan Davao, which was also my first 21km race. Seeing my teammates work hard and train religiously motivated me to do my part as the runner of the team.” Up to this day, Dianne is still running and strength training. She said that having a full-time job, and maintaining a healthy lifestyle is possible, as long as you stay consistent and put your mind to it.

  Joy Pondavilla

Joy Pondavilla

For Joy Pondavilla, determination and perseverance helped her to finish the 1.9 km swim leg in IM Davao. At first, her excitement in joining triathlon turned into worry, as she don’t know how to swim. “I worked full-time in the company that encouraged me to be a triathlete, and challenged me to meet the demands of my work.” She’s aware that she was challenged physically, mentally and emotionally during her training. But, the learnings from this experience gave her confidence to face challenges, and motivate her to be physically fit and healthy. “If you believe in yourself you will always reach your goal.”

As Rodrigo Arozado state it, "they call it running, but for me I call it diversion”. He learned that it is important to know our strengths, weaknesses, and limits. He also learned that it’s important to start and finish the race, we always need to move forward.  “Like running, there is a start and finish, if we connect it in our life, we start with excitement, doubt ourselves in the middle of the way, and triumph at the end of the race. There are things that cannot fulfill us unless we finish it.

  NEH Finishers

NEH Finishers

For Jay Jamio, joining IronMan Davao was the toughest challenge he ever had. Aside from being a newbie in triathlon, his busy work and training schedule added more flavor to this challenge. “You need to have that Ironman courage in you, not to be exhausted at the end of the day and for the next days. You need self-discipline to stay on track and determination to survive.” For non-triathletes, triathletes are often described as crazy people for doing hard training and race just for nothing, or for the medal at the finish line. But for Jay, triathletes are way beyond that. “Triathletes are not those bored people and those who do not have other things to do in their lives. Rather, they are the busiest ones whose time is well managed to ensure that every second count.” His trainings also changed how he perceive challenges. “I felt stronger and fulfilled for what I’m doing in day to day training. One thing why I love triathlon is that I develop discipline that I can instill in my work and in myself.” Jay was also able to lose 10kg, and minimize his alcohol consumption after training for IM Davao.

  NEH Phils Triathletes

NEH Phils Triathletes

Dianne, Joy, Rodrigo, and Jay, are full-time workers of NEH Philippines, an agriculture company that motivates its employees to adopt a healthy lifestyle through fitness activities and nutrition programs. These four full-time millennial workers proved, and will continue to prove that there is balance between work and triathlon. And that triathletes are not born, they are made through determination, hardwork, and faith in oneself. 

 

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